Drawing A Blank

An exhibition by Frank LeBon and Hanna Moon opens on 17th June.

Drawing A Blank will show several works from the artists alongside other names, and promises to be ’14 mini exhibitions’ in one.

For more info and an interview with the artists read DAZED

We live in Peckham

On Saturday 20th May at 6:30pm we will show ‘We live in Peckham’, a film by Marcus Hessenberg.

We Live In Peckham was filmed over three years, interviewing the locals, old and new, of an area currently under going many changes. Meet shopkeepers, residents and visitors to an area sometimes known as Little Lagos, The Golden Mile and the new Dalston and discuss if the recent regeneration has benefited everyone?

‘We live in Peckham’ is part of London Untold a new regular film night by Pempeople and Guap Magazine showcasing the best up and coming film creatives London has to offer.

When: Sat 20 May 2017, 18:30 – 21:30
Where: Livesey Exchange, 135 Bird in Bush Road, Peckham SE15 1QP

To book a free ticket go to Eventbrite

new sports pitch

On Wednesday 19th April at 3pm the new sports pitch will be opened. Millwall Football Club will deliver a special training session for the kids from Camlet School and afterwards the pitch will be open to the public.

The sports pitch improvement work was initiated by the Ledbury Estate TRA and funded through Southwark’s CGS Fund. what if: projects provided architectural input. Livesey Exchange will support the sports programme with WCs, showers and changing rooms once the first phase of capital works has been completed (dates tbc).

made with Norfolk flint

Ledbury Estate
Architect: GLC Architects Department
Built: mid-1960sSize: 16 blocks

The concrete panels of these twelve-storey towers were faced with Norfolk flint.

The Ledbury Estate in Peckham is a great example of the kind of post-war building most overlooked by fans of modern architecture. The low- and high-rise blocks on the estate were built using the most ubiquious form of construction of the era – prefabricated building systems. Used mainly for the rapid construction of council housing, these systems involved large concrete panels and components being manufactured in factories and transported by lorry to the site, where they were bolted together, like giant fat-pack furniture. Many companies produced these building systems, some of the biggest being Tracoba, Camus and Sectra from France, and Jespersen, Skarne and Larsen-Nielsen from Scandinavia. British construction firms such as John Laing and Taylor Woodrow-Anglian did deals to offer these systems to their customers in the UK. Councils desperate to keep pace with the demands made on them by successive governments, who were promising voters ever higher number of new homes, turned to these building systems as the answer to all their problems.

Four high-rise blocks form part of the Ledbury Estate: Skenfrith House, Sarnsfield House, Peterchurch House and Bromyard House. They were completed in the mid-1960s for the Greater London Council at the high point in the system building boom, and were made using the Danish Larsen-Nielsen system. The concrete panels of these twelve-storey towers were faced with Norfolk flint, and the blocks were immediately recognisable from their unusual design: two concrete slab blocks stood face to face, and were joined in the middle by a tower containing the lifts and stairs. From the air these blocks form a distinctive ‘H’ shape. Despite their rugged concrete stylings, these towers are less truly ‘brutalist’ and more part of the a Scandinavian influenced tradition of ‘point blocks’ like those at Alton Estate.

Larsen-Nielsen was one of the most ubiquitous systems used for building flats across Britain in the 1960s. The design of the Ledbury Estate flats could be seen repeated all over London. There are two taller blocks in Limehosue, reaching fifteen storeys, which have recently been refurbished and covered in an off-white render. And there are four more on Wick Road in Hackney as part of the Gascoyne Estate. These are ten storeys, and have been recently refurbished. The largest collection of them was to be found on the Morris Walk Estate in Woolwich, which was also London’s first use of the system. Here the seven ten-storey towers had been designed for the London County Council back in 1962. In 2013 residents began to be moved out ahead of the large scale demolition of the estate, and the eventual construction of (mainly private) new homes. (….)

Ledbury Estate has avoided being demolished, unlike Morris Walk, or re-rendered, like its siblings in Limehouse and Hackney have. The towers remain largely in their original condition.

This is an extract from the book ‘Brutal London’
Text: John Gindrod

Photographie: Alexander Christie and what if: projects

Toolbox making

On the 22nd March the Power Project lead another toolbox making workshop and were excited to have Jeanette Mason, the chair fo the Ledbury Estate Tenant and Resident Association take part.

The Power Project is run by James Green, Maya Alvarado and Louise Colgan. Material was sponsored by Pempeople.


 

 

 

 

Peter John visits Livesey Exchange

Thank you to Leader of the Council Peter John, Councillors Mark Williams, Michael Situ and Johnson Situ for visiting us on Friday 3rd March and supporting the project.

“It has been thrilling to visit the Livesey Exchange today – and to see the start of a journey which will bring local jobs and opportunities for local residents – genuinly inspired by everyone’s commitment and enthusiasm.” Peter John, 3.03.17

Images by: Alexander Christie

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Make your own toolbox

Power Project ran a very popular Make Your Own Toolbox workshop on Wednesday 8th March, 4-8pm, to celebrate International Women’s Day 2017. This womens workshop taucht skills in pan folding and metal finishing starting from a laser cut steel sheet. Power Project’s workshops attract a wide range of people and warmly welcome those making for the first time. Participants left with their own toolbox ready to house a current or future collection of tools.

The workshop was part funded by Keepmoat and supported by Pempeople.
Number of participants: 23

Feedback summary

During the first open days at the Ledbury Estate garages we started to collect feedback in response to the proposed plans and programme. We are very pleased and feel encouraged that 99% of people think that they will benefit from the proposed Livesey Exchange project.

29 people filled in a feedback form during the Peckham Festival on the 10th September 2016 and 73 people at the open day on the 14th January 2017.

Asked “what do you like the best” 30% of comments related to the community focus and diversity of the project. Here some quotes:

“I like that it is going to help the local community and young people.”

“The diversity of everything that’s on offer and overall vibe. Very inclusive and inspiring.”

“Innovation. Creative ideas that are bringing the community together in such a positive way. Possibilities are endless. Such a great space.”

40% of respondents liked the space, the proposed use and layout the best.

“Innovative use for a beautiful disused space.”

” The size of the space and potential for different projects.”

The feedback forms are also available online and we will continue throughout the spring 2017 to gather comments and suggestions that help to shape the project and the delivery which will take place in phases.

 

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OPEN DAY power project

Livesey Exchange workshop
14.01.1017, 1-4pm

Maya Alvarado and James Green ran an event for girls in metal work – making a clamp.

It was an awesome activity and we hope it is something that we can start to run more regularly at the Livesey Exchange. We are calling it Power Project.

Sugru provided free materials for the workshop.
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Livesey Exchange OPEN DAY Sat.14th January 1-4pm

Thanks to everyone who came along to the open day and to all those who helped to organise it. The clamp making in the Livesey workshop and the mobile forge were a great trial of what is about to come. Latin American dancers, ukolele performances, bubble blowing combined with architectural drawings and a model made for a fun and informative event.

We are very pleased about the 60 feedback forms we recieved on the day and that so many visitors told us what they thought about the proposed transformation of the garages on the Ledbury Estate. The feedback will be analysed and published in the near future.

Special thanks to: James Green and Maya Alvarado for running the ‘Power Project’ workshop, Kevin Boys for his mobile forge workshop, and the New Tribe Art’s Develpment for dance and music.

You can also leave your comments online

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LEX_forge 1 LEX_forge 2 LEX_forgeLEX_consultation 1LEX_Consulting_3
LEX_workshop

Funding for building work secured

Great news! Livesey Exchange has successfully attracted capital funding from the Mayor’s Regeneration Fund with match funding from Southwark Council, Southwark Tenant Fund and Airbnb. Building works is scheduled to commence in 2017.

Workspace exhibiton at NLA 13.10.-17.12.

Livesey Exchange proposals will be part of an exhibition at the New London Architecture Centre ‘Shaping London’s future workspaces’ 13.October – 17.December 2017

‘This exhibition discusses the changing nature of work in a time of flux: both internationally, technologically and culturally. What do we need for the future? Where will we working?’

‘With ever increasing lifespans, there may be four generations in one working environment; technological advances will afford new ways of working flexibly and collaboratively. Accommodation for commercial and industrial uses is under threat. London’s continued growth – to an expected 10 million people by 2039 – is pushing up land prices. In a post-Brexit world, London will have to work harder than ever to compete on a global level to attract and retain the best talent. The availability, affordability and quality of the spaces in which we work will be critical.”

More information

Peckham Festival

Plans for the proposed Old Kent Road studios will be on display. Come along and tell us what you think and what you would like to see in the space…

First public view
Saturday 10th September 11:00-18:00
part of Peckham Festival
Ledbury Estate garages, Old Kent Road, SE15 1QP

Livesey Exchange in the making.
Test 60 vacant garages as spaces for workshops, learning, socialising and experimentation.

The Peckham Weeklies together with Pempeople and what if: projects are hosting this event – including a mobile furniture repair workshop, graffiti workshop, screen printing, bike repairs, 80m races, table tennis, kids football and more.

Plans for the proposed Old Kent Road studios will be on display. Come along and tell us what you think and what you would like to see in the space.

Workshops and activities will be delivered by: James Green and Louise Colgan (mobile furniture repair workshop), Pempeople (bike repair), GUAP (online magazine), Dr. Adams (graffiti artist), Design Me (screen printing), Dulwich Table Tennis Club, Movement Factory (flash mob), House Warmers
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Share your skills

Share your skills with the OKR studios team. Nicholas (Pempeople) and Ulrike (what if: projects) will talk about the ideas and ambitions of the project, and the range of skills they are looking for.

Share your skills with the OKR studios team. Nicholas (Pempeople) and Ulrike (what if: projects) will talk about the ideas and ambitions of the project, and the range of skills they are looking for.

When: Thursday 1st September, 6.30pm for a 7.00pm start
Where: The NINES, Copeland Park, 133 Rye Lane, 133 Copeland Rd, Peckham, SE15 3SN

Organiser: Airbnb (project support and funder)

OKR Studios crowdfunding

The Livesey Exchange team ran a crowdfunding campaign ‘OKR studios’ and thanks to 209 individuals, businesses and organisations raised £53,754.

OKR studios crowdfunding campaign: May – August 2016
The Livesey Exchange team ran a crowdfunding campaign ‘OKR studios’ and thanks to 209 individuals, businesses and organisations raised £53,754. The project received the maximum Mayor of London pledge (£20K) and attracted funding from Airbnb and the Southwark Tenant Fund.

Funding raised as part of the crowdfunding campaign will be used to kick-start the project on site and make the garages useable for a programme that requires little infrastructure. Further funding for the construction works will be sourced from additional funders.

For information about the crowdfunding campaign refer to Spacehive.

Comments from supporters include:

“Once completed, it will be a real asset for Peckham residents.”
Councillor Michael Situ 27 May 2016

“This is a much needed resource in the community! And an opportunity for all to get involved from the grass roots!” Denise Baird, 18 July 2016

“This would be a huge asset to the area – an exciting community project with so many interesting facets”. Alex Crawford, 20 May 2016 21:25

“This will be an excellent space for our young people to hangout which will increase their confidence and well being.” Carol Ossai-Nwosu, 25 June 2016

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NLA on location tour

what if: projects, Pempeople and Mark Brearley of local business Kaymet and founder of Vital OKR contributed to the ‘New London Architecture-Southwark On Location conference’.

NLA Southwark On Location tour

Visit of the Ledbury Estate garage space that is to become the Ledbury Exchange.

what if: projects, Pempeople and Mark Brearley of local business Kaymet and founder of Vital OKR contributed to the ‘New London Architecture-Southwark On Location conference’.

Extracts from Mark Brearley’s speech:

“I’m Mark Brearley from local manufacturing business Kaymet. (…) We have been in this area since 1947; A seven person enterprise that produces 15,000 beautiful aluminium trays each year and exports to 30 countries.

This initiative, the Ledbury Exchange, has superb intent. We are happy to support it, as are many other businesses around here. A good thing is about to happen in this space, pushed forward by a group of brilliant local people.

In the Opportunity Area currently there are over 10,000 jobs in around 800 businesses. This is not nothing.

Nearly half of the jobs, about four and a half thousand, are in industrial activities, with some fold over into studio goings on. It’s this part of the economy that offers the readiest chances for growth, and that has so much to offer the area’s residents. It could happily and easily double, if it had the right space. It wants to be here. (…)”

Vital OKR seeks to give a voice to the economy of the Old Kent Road.
Have a look: Vital OKR gallery

OKR screen print
OKR screen print. Based on Peckham Civic Centre OKR mosaic by Adam Kossowski, 1965.